Navigating the eBook Revolution

An American Libraries magazine article which speculates that by the end of 2012 libraries may be spending 20% of their collection budgets on digital content, and possibly 50% by the end of three years. The views of a number of parties in the book industry are discussed, including the reader, the writer, the bookseller, the publisher, and the librarian.

Read more at americanlibrariesmagazine.org.

Waterstones Makes Deal to Sell the Amazon Kindle, Dismaying Many

This LA Times article points out, with a number of links, the apparent conflict of interest between British bookstore chain Waterstones and Amazon. I, too, would be interested in knowing exactly what Waterstones is thinking, or what real benefit they are getting out of this. Is this an indication that perhaps Amazon will be purchasing the bookstore chain? I cannot otherwise imagine what benefit there would be to carrying not only a competitor’s product, but a competitor’s product which specifically enables your customers to never be your customers again.

Read more at latimes.com.

Amazon Removes Kindle Versions of IPG Books After Distributor Declines to Change Selling Terms

Amazon has taken down the Kindle editions of all Independent Publishers Group titles after the two companies failed to come to an agreement regarding terms for sale of digital products. IPG indicated that Amazon wished to change the terms to substantially change the revenue that authors would see. IPG titles continue to be sold through Barnes & Noble.

Read more at publishersmarketplace.com.

OverDrive and Amazon Launch Kindle Compatibility with Library eBooks

OverDrive has begun adding Kindle compatibility to all of the libraries in its network. This opens up options to Kindle owners which were previously only available to owners of other devices. Of course, your library still has to be a member of the OverDrive network in order for you to make use of this new feature!

Read more at overdrive.com.